Ditchling Beacon by Paula Oakley
Ditchling Beacon by Paula Oakley

Regardless of the era and the style of the paintings depicting the British landscape, they all have something in common which captures the particularity of the islands: the green grass and the movement of the clouds.

From Constable and Gainsborough to today’s artists, landscape painting went through a lot of iterations in order to establish itself as a reputable art genre. In an era when portrait paintings were nobler, British landscape artists fought their way by continuing to be inspired by the land with its beauty and picturesque views.

The Lake District, Wales and Scotland offered plenty of opportunities not just for tourists enjoying the views but also for artists who wanted to paint something different.  Today, the landscape is amongst the most popular genres for artists and collectors alike and the British landscape offers a never-ending source of inspiration for local artists, regardless of their style and the media they create in.

But what elements make a landscape typically British? Is it the shades of green? The clouds? The cottages? The woodland? The meadow? The rain?

“I love to paint beautiful skylines and often explore the lakes and national parks for inspiration with my camera permanently fixed to me wherever I go. Currently, I am loving the Lake District and have found many of my current works are based in this area as my family and I spend many weeks here throughout the year”, says Pete Rumney.

Inspired Grasmere by Tiffany Budd
Inspired Grasmere by Tiffany Budd
Daisy Meadow by CK Wood
Daisy Meadow by CK Wood
Road Home by Pete Rumney
Road Home by Pete Rumney
Malmsmead by Shirley Netherton
Malmsmead by Shirley Netherton